Level 3: Mastery

Overview

Now that you have learned to assess the reliability of a source, and to analyze & evaluate various arguments presented in a source, we are going to combine both skills and apply them to various real-life debates on controversial issues. You will need to consider all the information you can to evaluate the information presented in the following assignments:

Assignment 1

Can you determine whether a given source is reliable?

Hint: Try to corroborate the information...

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Assignment 2

A given source might be good... or it might be bad... at the same time!

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Assignment 3

On Twitter (or facebook) people may post a legitimate news article, only to misrepresent what that article is really saying. Can you tell when this is happening?

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Assignment 4

Videos can be remarkably persuasive. In spite of that, can you tell when a video contains less-than-trustworthy information?

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Assignment 5

Can you evaluate the truth of a claim by using an internet search?

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Assignment 6

Robert Reich is a famous economist and U.C. Berkeley Professor - but do you trust what he has to say?

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Assignment 7

Back to basics: can you determine the reliability of a given source?

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Civic Online Reasoning & IGCSE Global Perspectives Skills

The above resources are based on the Stanford History Education Group's Civic Online Reasoning project. If you are a teacher, you can click here to download the original lessons plus the rubrics for each activity; a SHEG account is free to sign-up, and all the lessons are free as well.